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Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today in History

Today is Saturday, Nov. 14, the 319th day of 2020. There are 47 days left in the year.

Todayís Highlight in History:

On Nov. 14, 1970, a chartered Southern Airways DC-9 crashed while trying to land in West Virginia, killing all 75 people on board, including the Marshall University football team and its coaching staff.

On this date:

In 1851, Herman Melvilleís novel ìMoby-Dick; Or, The Whaleî was published in the United States, almost a month after being released in Britain.

In 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln gave the go-ahead for Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnsideís plan to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond; the resulting Battle of Fredericksburg proved a disaster for the Union.

In 1889, Jawarharlal Nehru (juh-wah-hahr-LAHLí NAYí-roo), the first prime minister of India, was born.

In 1910, Eugene B. Ely became the first aviator to take off from a ship as his Curtiss pusher rolled off a sloping platform on the deck of the scout cruiser USS Birmingham off Hampton Roads, Virginia.

In 1915, African-American educator Booker T. Washington, 59, died in Tuskegee, Alabama.

In 1940, during World War II, German planes destroyed most of the English town of Coventry.

In 1965, the U.S. Armyís first major military operation of the Vietnam War began with the start of the five-day Battle of Ia Drang. (The fighting between American troops and North Vietnamese forces ended on Nov. 18 with both sides claiming victory.)

In 1969, Apollo 12 blasted off for the moon.

In 1972, the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above the 1,000 level for the first time, ending the day at 1,003.16.

In 1990, it was revealed that the pop duo Milli Vanilli (Rob Pilatus and Fabrice Morvan) had done none of the singing on their Grammy-winning debut album, ìGirl You Know Itís True.î

In 1996, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin (BURNí-uh-deen), the senior Roman Catholic prelate in the United States and leader of Chicagoís 2.3 million Catholics, died at his home at age 68. Singer Michael Jackson married his plastic surgeonís nurse, Debbie Rowe, in a ceremony in Sydney, Australia. (Rowe filed for divorce in 1999.)

In 1997, a jury in Fairfax, Virginia, decided that Pakistani national Aimal Khan Kasi (eye-MAHLí kahn KAHí-see) should get the death penalty for gunning down two CIA employees outside agency headquarters. (Five years later on this date, Aimal Khan Kasi was executed.)

Ten years ago: A 21-member Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum meeting in Yokohama, Japan, concluded with a unanimous pledge by members to avoid raising more trade barriers and to roll back those they may have erected in the midst of crisis. Somali pirates released British couple Paul and Rachel Chandler, who were held for 388 days after they were abducted from their 38-foot-yacht.

Five years ago: The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for a wave of attacks in Paris that killed 130 people and said France would remain at the ìtop of the listî of its targets. A high-speed train undergoing a test run derailed and plunged into a canal in northeast France, killing 11 people.

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