Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Monday, June 29, the 180th day of 2015. There are 185 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 29, 1767, Britain approved the Townshend Revenue Act, which imposed import duties on glass, paint, oil, lead, paper and tea shipped to the American colonies. (Colonists bitterly protested, prompting Parliament to repeal the duties – except for tea.)

On this date:

In 1613, London’s original Globe Theatre, where many of Shakespeare’s plays were performed, was destroyed by a fire sparked by a cannon shot during a performance of “Henry VIII.”

In 1880, France annexed Tahiti, which became a French colony on December 30, 1880.

In 1913, the Second Balkan War broke out as Bulgaria attacked Serbia and Greece, its former allies from the First Balkan War.

In 1927, the first trans-Pacific airplane flight was completed as Lt. Lester J. Maitland and Lt. Albert F. Hegenberger arrived at Wheeler Field in Hawaii aboard the Bird of Paradise, an Atlantic-Fokker C-2, after flying 2,400 miles from Oakland, California, in 25 hours, 50 minutes.

In 1941, Polish statesman, pianist and composer Ignacy Jan Paderewski (een-YAHS’ yahn pah-dayr-EF’-skee) died in New York at age 80.

In 1954, the Atomic Energy Commission voted against reinstating Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer’s access to classified information.

In 1967, Jerusalem was re-unified as Israel removed barricades separating the Old City from the Israeli sector.

In 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a trio of death sentences, saying the way they had been imposed constituted cruel and unusual punishment. (The ruling prompted states to effectively impose a moratorium on executions until their capital punishment laws could be revised.)

In 1988, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Morrison v. Olson, upheld the independent counsel law in a 7-1 decision (the sole dissenter was Justice Antonin Scalia).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Saturday, June 27, the 178th day of 2015. There are 187 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 27, 1955, Illinois enacted the nation’s first automobile seat belt law. (The law did not require cars to have seat belts, but that they be made seat belt-ready.)

On this date:

In 1787, English historian Edward Gibbon completed work on his six-volume work, “The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.”

In 1844, Mormon leader Joseph Smith and his brother, Hyrum, were killed by a mob in Carthage, Illinois.

In 1864, Confederate forces repelled a frontal assault by Union troops in the Civil War Battle of Kennesaw Mountain in Georgia. In 1905, the Industrial Workers of the World was founded in Chicago.

In 1922, the first Newberry Medal, recognizing excellence in children’s literature, was awarded to “The Story of Mankind” by Hendrik Willem van Loon.

In 1944, during World War II, American forces liberated the French port of Cherbourg from the Germans.

In 1957, more than 500 people were killed when Hurricane Audrey slammed through coastal Louisiana and Texas.

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy spent the first full day of a visit to Ireland, the land of his ancestors, stopping by the County Wexford home of his great-grandfather, Patrick Kennedy, who’d emigrated to America in 1848. In 1974, President Richard Nixon opened an official visit to the Soviet Union. In 1985, the legendary Route 66, which originally stretched from Chicago to Santa Monica, California, passed into history as officials decertified the road.

In 1990, NASA announced that a flaw in the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope was preventing the instrument from achieving optimum focus. (The problem was traced to a mirror that had not been ground to exact specifications; corrective optics were later installed to fix the problem.)

In 1995, Jodi Huisentruit, 27, an anchorwoman for KIMT-TV in Mason City, Iowa, mysteriously disappeared; her fate has never been determined.

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Friday, June 26, the 177th day of 2015. There are 188 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 26, 1945, the charter of the United Nations was signed by 50 countries in San Francisco.

On this date:

In 1483, Richard III began his reign as King of England (he was crowned the following month at Westminster Abbey).

In 1870, the first section of Atlantic City, New Jersey’s Boardwalk was opened to the public.

In 1915, following a whirlwind courtship, poet T.S. Eliot married Vivienne Haigh-Wood in London. (The marriage proved disastrous, but the couple never divorced.) Air conditioning manufacturer Carrier Engineering Corp. was incorporated in New York.

In 1925, Charles Chaplin’s classic comedy “The Gold Rush” premiered at Grauman’s Egyptian Theatre in Hollywood.

In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was nominated for a second term of office by delegates to the Democratic national convention in Philadelphia.

In 1950, President Harry S. Truman authorized the U.S. Air Force and Navy to enter the Korean War.

In 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower joined Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II in ceremonies officially opening the St. Lawrence Seaway. Swedish boxer Ingemar Johansson knocked out Floyd Patterson in the third round of their match at New York’s Yankee Stadium to win the heavyweight title.

In 1963, President John F. Kennedy visited West Berlin, where he delivered his famous speech expressing solidarity with the city’s residents, declaring: “Ich bin ein Berliner” (I am a Berliner).

In 1973, former White House counsel John W. Dean told the Senate Watergate Committee about an “enemies list” kept by the Nixon White House.

In 1974, the supermarket price scanner made its debut in Troy, Ohio, as a 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit chewing gum costing 67 cents and bearing a Uniform Product Code (UPC) was scanned by a Marsh Supermarket cashier.

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Thursday, June 25, the 176th day of 2015. There are 189 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 25, 1950, war broke out in Korea as forces from the communist North invaded the South.

On this date:

In 1788, Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution.

In 1876, Lt. Col. Colonel George A. Custer and his 7th Cavalry were wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians in the Battle of the Little Bighorn in Montana.

In 1910, President William Howard Taft signed the White-Slave Traffic Act, more popularly known as the Mann Act, which made it illegal to transport women across state lines for “immoral” purposes.

In 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 was enacted.

In 1943, Congress passed, over President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s veto, the Smith-Connally Anti-Strike Act, which allowed the federal government to seize and operate privately owned war plants facing labor strikes.

In 1959, spree killer Charles Starkweather, 20, was put to death in Nebraska’s electric chair. Eamon de Valera was inaugurated as president of Ireland.

In 1962, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that recitation of a state-sponsored prayer in New York State public schools was unconstitutional.

In 1975, the government of Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi declared a state of emergency aimed at cracking down on political opponents. (The state of emergency was lifted in March 1977.)

In 1981, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that male-only draft registration was constitutional.

In 1990, the U.S. Supreme Court, in its first “right-to-die” decision, ruled that family members could be barred from ending the lives of persistently comatose relatives who had not made their wishes known conclusively. African National Congress leader Nelson Mandela met with President George H.W. Bush at the White House. In 1995, Warren Burger, the 15th chief justice of the United States, died in Washington at age 87.

In 2009, death claimed Michael Jackson, the “King of Pop,” in Los Angeles at age 50 and actress Farrah Fawcett in Santa Monica, California, at age 62.

Ten years ago: Hardline Tehran mayor Mahmoud Ahmadinejad (mahk-MOOD’ ah-muh-DEE’-neh-zhadh) was declared the winner of Iran’s presidential runoff election. The NAACP selected retired Verizon executive Bruce S. Gordon to be its new president.

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, June 24, the 175th day of 2015. There are 190 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 24, 1975, 113 people were killed when Eastern Airlines Flight 66, a Boeing 727 carrying 124 people, crashed while attempting to land during a thunderstorm at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

On this date:

In 1509, Henry VIII was crowned king of England; his wife, Catherine of Aragon, was crowned queen consort.

In 1793, the first republican constitution in France was adopted.

In 1880, “O Canada,” the future Canadian national anthem, was first performed in Quebec City.

In 1908, Grover Cleveland, the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, died in Princeton, New Jersey, at age 71.

In 1939, the Southeast Asian country Siam changed its name to Thailand. (It went back to being Siam in 1945, then became Thailand once again in 1949.)

In 1940, France signed an armistice with Italy during World War II.

In 1948, Communist forces cut off all land and water routes between West Germany and West Berlin, prompting the western allies to organize the Berlin Airlift.

In 1964, AT&T inaugurated commercial “Picturephone” service between New York, Chicago and Washington, D.C. (the service, however, never caught on).

In 1968, “Resurrection City,” a shantytown constructed as part of the Poor People’s March on Washington D.C., was closed down by authorities.

In 1983, the space shuttle Challenger – carrying America’s first woman in space, Sally K. Ride – coasted to a safe landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California.

In 1985, a federal judge in New York found former Wall Street Journal reporter R. Foster Winans guilty of illegally using his position at the paper in a get-rich-quick insider-trading scheme. (Winans served eight months in federal prison.)

In 1990, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan was virtually drowned out by jeering demonstrators as he addressed the Sixth International AIDS conference in San Francisco.

Thought for Today: “All are lunatics, but he who can analyze his delusions is called a philosopher.” – Ambrose Bierce, author

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, June 23, the 174th day of 2015. There are 191 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On June 23, 1972, President Richard Nixon and White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman discussed using the CIA to obstruct the FBI’s Watergate investigation. (Revelation of the tape recording of this conversation sparked Nixon’s resignation in 1974.) The same day, President Nixon signed Title IX, which barred discrimination on the basis of sex for “any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.”

On this date:

In 1314, during the First War of Scottish Independence, the two-day Battle of Bannockburn, resulting in victory for the forces of Robert the Bruce over the army of King Edward II, began near Stirling.

In 1757, forces of the East India Company led by Robert Clive won the Battle of Plassey, which effectively marked the beginning of British colonial rule in India.

In 1812, Britain, unaware that America had declared war against it five days earlier, rescinded its policy on neutral shipping, a major issue of contention between the two countries.

In 1904, President Theodore Roosevelt was nominated for a second term of office at the Republican national convention in Chicago.

In 1931, aviators Wiley Post and Harold Gatty took off from New York on a round-the-world flight that lasted eight days and 15 hours.

In 1938, the Civil Aeronautics Authority was established.

In 1947, the Senate joined the House in overriding President Harry S. Truman’s veto of the Taft-Hartley Act, designed to limit the power of organized labor.

In 1956, Gamal Abdel Nasser was elected president of Egypt.

In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin (ah-LEK’-say koh-SEE’-gihn) held the first of two meetings at Glassboro State College in New Jersey.

In 1969, Warren E. Burger was sworn in as chief justice of the United States by the man he was succeeding, Earl Warren.

In 1985, all 329 people aboard an Air India Boeing 747 were killed when the plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near Ireland because of a bomb authorities believe was planted by Sikh separatists.

In 1995, Dr. Jonas Salk, the medical pioneer who developed the first vaccine to halt the crippling rampage of polio, died in La Jolla (HOY’-ah), California, at age 80.

Ten years ago: The White House defended presidential adviser Karl Rove against Democratic demands he apologize or quit for saying “liberals saw the savagery of the 9/11 attacks and wanted to prepare indictments and offer therapy and understanding for our attackers.”

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Monday, June 22, the 173rd day of 2015. There are 192 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 22, 1945, the World War II battle for Okinawa ended with an Allied victory.

On this date:

In 1611, English explorer Henry Hudson, his son and several other people were set adrift in present-day Hudson Bay by mutineers aboard the Discovery; their fate remains unknown.

In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte abdicated for a second time as Emperor of the French.

In 1870, the United States Department of Justice was created.

In 1911, Britain’s King George V was crowned at Westminster Abbey.

In 1937, Joe Louis began his reign as world heavyweight boxing champion by knocking out Jim Braddock in the eighth round of their fight in Chicago. (A year later on this date, Louis knocked out Max Schmeling in the first round of their rematch at Yankee Stadium.)

In 1940, during World War II, Adolf Hitler gained a stunning victory as France was forced to sign an armistice eight days after German forces overran Paris.

In 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the “GI Bill of Rights.”

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Saturday, June 20, the 171st day of 2015. There are 194 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 20, 1975, Steven Spielberg’s shark thriller “Jaws,” starring Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw and Richard Dreyfuss (not to mention a mechanical shark nicknamed “Bruce”) was released by Universal Pictures.

On this date:

In 1782, Congress approved the Great Seal of the United States, featuring the emblem of the bald eagle.

In 1837, Queen Victoria acceded to the British throne following the death of her uncle, King William IV.

In 1863, West Virginia became the 35th state.

In 1893, a jury in New Bedford, Massachusetts, found Lizzie Borden not guilty of the ax murders of her father and stepmother.

In 1921, U.S. Rep. Alice Mary Robertson, R-Okla., became the first woman to preside over a session of the House of Representatives.

In 1943, race-related rioting erupted in Detroit; federal troops were sent in two days later to quell the violence that resulted in more than 30 deaths.

In 1944, during World War II, Japanese naval forces retreated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea after suffering heavy losses to the victorious American fleet.

In 1947, Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel was shot dead at the Beverly Hills, California, mansion of his girlfriend, Virginia Hill, apparently at the order of mob associates.

In 1967, boxer Muhammad Ali was convicted in Houston of violating Selective Service laws by refusing to be drafted. (Ali’s conviction was ultimately overturned by the Supreme Court).

In 1979, ABC News correspondent Bill Stewart was shot to death in Managua, Nicaragua, by a member of President Anastasio Somoza’s national guard.

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Friday, June 19, the 170th day of 2015. There are 195 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 19, 1865, Union troops commanded by Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, with news that the Civil War was over, and that all remaining slaves in Texas were free, an event celebrated to this day as “Juneteenth.”

On this date:

In 1764, Jose Gervasio Artigas, considered the father of Uruguayan independence, was born in Montevideo.

In 1864, during the Civil War, the Confederate sloop-of-war CSS Alabama was sunk by the USS Kearsarge (also a sloop-of-war) off Cherbourg, France.

In 1910, the first-ever Father’s Day was celebrated in Spokane, Washington. (The idea for the observance is credited to Sonora Louise Smart Dodd.)

In 1934, the Federal Communications Commission was created; it replaced the Federal Radio Commission.

In 1944, during World War II, the two-day Battle of the Philippine Sea began, resulting in a decisive victory for the Americans over the Japanese.

In 1945, millions of New Yorkers turned out to cheer Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was honored with a parade.

In 1953, Julius Rosenberg, 35, and his wife, Ethel, 37, convicted of conspiring to pass U.S. atomic secrets to the Soviet Union, were executed at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, New York.

In 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was approved by the U.S. Senate, 73-27, after surviving a lengthy filibuster.

In 1972, Hurricane Agnes, blamed for at least 122 deaths, made landfall over the Florida Panhandle.

In 1975, former Chicago organized crime boss Sam Giancana was shot to death in the basement of his home in Oak Park, Illinois; the killing has never been solved.

In 1986, University of Maryland basketball star Len Bias, the first draft pick of the Boston Celtics, suffered a fatal cocaine-induced seizure. Artificial heart recipient Murray P. Haydon died in Louisville, Kentucky, after 16 months on the manmade pump.

In 1999, author Stephen King was seriously injured when he was struck by a van driven by Bryan Smith in North Lovell, Maine. Britain’s Prince Edward married commoner Sophie Rhys-Jones (rees johnz) in Windsor, England.

Ten years ago: Fighting raged across southern Afghanistan as the U.S. military pounded suspected Taliban positions with airstrikes. Michael Campbell answered every challenge Tiger Woods threw his way for a two-shot victory in the U.S. Open. Fourteen Formula One drivers refused to participate in the United States Grand Prix because of unresolved concerns over the safety of their Michelin tires.

– – –

Thought for Today: “Exuberance is better than taste.” – Gustave Flaubert, French author (1821-1880).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Thursday, June 18, the 169th day of 2015. There are 196 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 18, 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte met his Waterloo as British and Prussian troops defeated the French in Belgium.

On this date:

In 1778, American forces entered Philadelphia as the British withdrew during the Revolutionary War.

In 1812, the War of 1812 began as the United States Congress approved, and President James Madison signed, a declaration of war against Britain.

In 1873, suffragist Susan B. Anthony was found guilty by a judge in Canandaigua, New York, of breaking the law by casting a vote in the 1872 presidential election. (The judge fined Anthony $100, but she never paid the penalty.)

In 1908, William Howard Taft was nominated for president by the Republican National Convention in Chicago.

In 1940, during World War II, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill urged his countrymen to conduct themselves in a manner that would prompt future generations to say, “This was their finest hour.” Charles de Gaulle delivered a speech on the BBC in which he rallied his countrymen after the fall of France to Nazi Germany.

In 1945, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower received a tumultuous welcome in Washington D.C., where he addressed a joint session of Congress. William Joyce, known as “Lord Haw-Haw,” was charged in London with high treason for his English-language wartime broadcasts on German radio. (He was hanged in January 1946.)

In 1953, a U.S. Air Force Douglas C-124 Globemaster II crashed near Tokyo, killing all 129 people on board. Egypt’s 148-year-old Muhammad Ali Dynasty came to an end with the overthrow of the monarchy and the proclamation of a republic.

In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson and Japanese Prime Minister Hayato Ikeda spoke to each other by telephone as they inaugurated the first trans-Pacific cable completed by AT&T between Japan and Hawaii.

In 1975, NBC launched its News and Information Service, an all-news radio network. (NIS lasted until May 1977.)

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter and Soviet President Leonid I. Brezhnev signed the SALT II strategic arms limitation treaty in Vienna.

In 1983, astronaut Sally K. Ride became America’s first woman in space as she and four colleagues blasted off aboard the space shuttle Challenger on a six-day mission.

In 1992, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Georgia v. McCollum, ruled that criminal defendants could not use race as a basis for excluding potential jurors from their trials. Entertainer Peter Allen died in San Diego County, California, at age 48.

Ten years ago: U.S. Marines and Iraqi forces battled insurgents in a restive western Iraqi province, killing about 50 militants in the military’s latest campaign to stop foreign fighters who were infiltrating from neighboring Syria. In his Saturday radio address, President George W. Bush said pulling out of Iraq immediately was not an option. Former Texas Congressman J.J. “Jake” Pickle died in Austin at age 91.

Five years ago: Death row inmate Ronnie Lee Gardner died in a barrage of bullets as Utah carried out its first firing squad execution in 14 years.

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, June 17, the 168th day of 2015. There are 197 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 17, 1775, the Revolutionary War Battle of Bunker Hill resulted in a costly victory for the British, who suffered heavy losses.

On this date:

In 1789, during the French Revolution, the Third Estate declared itself a national assembly, and undertook to frame a constitution. (This gathering gave rise to the political terms “left wing” and “right wing,” with deputies representing commoners sitting to the left of the assembly president, and nobles sitting to the right.)

In 1885, the Statue of Liberty arrived in New York Harbor aboard the French ship Isere (ee-SEHR’).

In 1928, Amelia Earhart embarked on a trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland to Wales with pilots Wilmer Stultz and Louis Gordon, becoming the first woman to make the trip as a passenger.

In 1930, President Herbert Hoover signed the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act, which boosted U.S. tariffs to historically high levels, prompting foreign retaliation.

In 1940, France asked Germany for terms of surrender in World War II.

In 1944, the Republic of Iceland was established.

In 1953, U.S. Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas stayed the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, originally set for the next day, the couple’s 14th wedding anniversary. (They were put to death June 19.)

In 1961, Soviet ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev defected to the West while his troupe was in Paris.

In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon’s eventual downfall began with the arrest of five burglars inside Democratic national headquarters in Washington D.C.’s Watergate complex.

In 1985, Discovery Channel made its cable TV debut.

In 1992, President George H.W. Bush and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed a breakthrough arms-reduction agreement.

In 1994, after leading police on a slow-speed chase on Southern California freeways, O.J. Simpson was arrested and charged with murder in the slayings of his ex-wife, Nicole, and her friend, Ronald Goldman. (Simpson was later acquitted in a criminal trial, but held liable in a civil trial.)

Ten years ago: The nation’s Roman Catholic bishops agreed to a five-year extension on their unprecedented policy of permanently barring sexually abusive clergy from church work. Marcus Wesson, the domineering patriarch of a large clan he’d bred through incest, was convicted in Fresno, California, of murdering nine of his children. (Wesson was later sentenced to death.) Former Tyco CEO Dennis Kozlowski and a second executive, Mark H. Swartz, were convicted of looting their company of more than $600 million. (Kozlowsky was paroled in January 2014; Swartz was released in October 2013.) Iran’s presidential election was thrown into a run-off after no candidate won over 50 percent of the vote. (Tehran’s conservative mayor, Mahmoud Ahmedinejad (mahk-MOOD’ ah-muh-DEE’-neh-zhadh), emerged the winner.)

Five years ago: BP chief executive Tony Hayward told a congressional hearing he was “deeply sorry” for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, but infuriated lawmakers as he disclaimed knowledge of any of the myriad problems leading up to the disaster. Israel agreed to ease its three-year-old land blockade of the Hamas-ruled Gaza Strip. The Los Angeles Lakers rallied in Game 7, defeating the Boston Celtics 83-79 to repeat as NBA champions.

— –

Thought for Today: “When all men think alike, no one thinks very much.” – Walter Lippmann, American journalist (1889-1974).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, June 16, the 167th day of 2015. There are 198 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 16, 1955, members of Argentina’s military bombarded the Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires in a failed attempt to assassinate President Juan Domingo Peron and his Cabinet, causing hundreds of civilian deaths, the same day Peron was excommunicated by Pope Pius XII for expelling two bishops from his country (however, the ban was effectively lifted in 1963).

On this date:

In 1567, Mary, Queen of Scots, was imprisoned in Lochleven Castle in Scotland. (She escaped almost a year later but ended up imprisoned again.)

In 1858, accepting the Illinois Republican Party’s nomination for the U.S. Senate, Abraham Lincoln said the slavery issue had to be resolved, declaring, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

In 1903, Ford Motor Co. was incorporated.

In 1911, IBM had its beginnings as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Co. was incorporated in New York State.

In 1933, the National Industrial Recovery Act became law with President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s signature. (The Act was later struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court.) The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. was founded as President Roosevelt signed the Banking Act of 1933.

In 1943, comedian Charles Chaplin, 54, married his fourth wife, 18-year-old Oona O’Neill, daughter of playwright Eugene O’Neill, in Carpinteria, California.

In 1944, George Stinney, a 14-year-old black youth, became the youngest person to die in the electric chair as the state of South Carolina executed him for the murders of two white girls, Betty June Binnicker, 11, and Mary Emma Thames, 7.

In 1963, the world’s first female space traveler, Valentina Tereshkova (teh-ruhsh-KOH’-vuh), 26, was launched into orbit by the Soviet Union aboard Vostok 6; she spent 71 hours in flight, circling the Earth 48 times before returning safely.

In 1978, President Jimmy Carter and Panamanian leader Omar Torrijos (toh-REE’-ohs) exchanged the instruments of ratification for the Panama Canal treaties.

Thought for Today: “I have never in my life learned anything from any man who agreed with me.” – Dudley Field Malone, American attorney (1882-1950).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Monday, June 15, the 166th day of 2015. There are 199 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 15, 1215, England’s King John put his seal to Magna Carta (“the Great Charter”) at Runnymede.

On this date:

In 1775, the Second Continental Congress voted unanimously to appoint George Washington head of the Continental Army.

In 1836, Arkansas became the 25th state.

In 1849, James Polk, the 11th president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tennessee.

In 1864, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton signed an order establishing a military burial ground which became Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

In 1904, more than 1,000 people died when fire erupted aboard the steamboat General Slocum in New York’s East River.

In 1934, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed an act making the National Guard part of the U.S. Army in the event of war or national emergency.

In 1944, American forces began their successful invasion of Saipan (sy-PAN’) during World War II. B-29 Superfortresses carried out their first raids on Japan.

In 1955, the United States and Britain signed a cooperation agreement concerning atomic information for “mutual defence purposes.”

In 1962, Students for a Democratic Society issued the Port Huron Statement at the conclusion of a five-day convention in Michigan.

In 1978, King Hussein (hoo-SAYN’) of Jordan married 26-year-old American Lisa Halaby, who became Queen Noor.

In 1984, composer-librettist Meredith Willson (“The Music Man”) died in Santa Monica, California, at age 82.

In 1994, Israel and the Vatican established full diplomatic relations. The Walt Disney animated feature “The Lion King” was released by Buena Vista Pictures.

Ten years ago: The autopsy released on Terri Schiavo (SHY’-voh) backed the contention of her husband, Michael, that she had been in a persistent vegetative state, finding she was severely and irreversibly brain-damaged and blind as well. Iraqi and U.S. forces freed Australian hostage Douglas Wood. Former Baylor basketball player Carlton Dotson was sentenced to 35 years in prison, a week after he unexpectedly pleaded guilty to murdering teammate Patrick Dennehy.

Five years ago: In his first Oval Office address, President Barack Obama promised that “we will make BP pay for the damage their company has caused,” describing the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico as a “siege” on the shores of America. Mexican President Felipe Calderon appealed to his fellow citizens to support the fight against organized crime just hours after troops killed 15 suspected gang members.

One year ago: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu accused the Hamas militant group of kidnapping three Israeli teenagers who had disappeared on June 12 (the teens’ bodies were found June 30). Death claimed “American Top 40” host Casey Kasem, 82; “Flowers for Algernon” author Daniel Keyes, 86; and French actor Jacques Bergerac, 87.

Thought for Today: “The times are not so bad as they seem; they couldn’t be.” – John Franklin Carter, American commentator and author (1897-1967).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Saturday, June 13, the 164th day of 2015. There are 201 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 13, 1865, Nobel Prize-winning poet-playwright William Butler Yeats was born in Dublin, Ireland.

On this date:

In 1525, German theologian Martin Luther married former nun Katharina von Bora.

In 1842, Queen Victoria became the first British monarch to ride on a train, traveling from Slough Railway Station to Paddington in 25 minutes.

In 1886, King Ludwig II of Bavaria drowned in Lake Starnberg.

In 1927, aviation hero Charles Lindbergh was honored with a ticker-tape parade in New York City.

In 1935, James Braddock claimed the title of world heavyweight boxing champion from Max Baer in a 15-round fight in Queens, New York. “Becky Sharp,” the first movie photographed in “three-strip” Technicolor, opened in New York.

In 1942, the first of two four-man Nazi sabotage teams arrived in the United States during World War II. (The eight were arrested after one of them went to U.S. authorities; six of the saboteurs were executed.)

In 1957, the Mayflower II, a replica of the ship that brought the Pilgrims to America in 1620, arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts, after a nearly two-month journey from England.

In 1966, the Supreme Court ruled in Miranda v. Arizona that criminal suspects had to be informed of their constitutional right to consult with an attorney and to remain silent.

In 1971, The New York Times began publishing excerpts of the Pentagon Papers, a secret study of America’s involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967 that had been leaked to the paper by military analyst Daniel Ellsberg.

In 1981, a scare occurred during a parade in London when a teenager fired six blank shots at Queen Elizabeth II.

In 1983, the U.S. space probe Pioneer 10, launched in 1972, became the first spacecraft to leave the solar system as it crossed the orbit of Neptune.

In 1996, the 81-day-old Freemen standoff ended as 16 remaining members of the anti-government group surrendered to the FBI and left their Montana ranch.

Ten years ago: A jury in Santa Maria, California, acquitted Michael Jackson of molesting a 13-year-old cancer survivor at his Neverland ranch.

Thought for Today: “There are no strangers here, only friends you have not yet met.” – William Butler Yeats (1865-1939).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Friday, June 12, the 163rd day of 2015. There are 202 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 12, 1965, the British government announced that The Beatles would each be made an MBE (Member of the Order of the British Empire) by Queen Elizabeth II at Buckingham Palace later in the year; the selection sparked criticism, with some MBEs returning their medals in protest.

On this date:

In 1776, Virginia’s colonial legislature became the first to adopt a Bill of Rights.

In 1920, the Republican national convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Warren G. Harding for president on the tenth ballot; Calvin Coolidge was nominated for vice president.

In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge was nominated for a term of office in his own right at the Republican national convention in Cleveland. (Coolidge had become president in 1923 upon the sudden death of Warren G. Harding.)

In 1939, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum was dedicated in Cooperstown, New York.

In 1942, Anne Frank, a German-born Jewish girl living in Amsterdam, received a diary for her 13th birthday, less than a month before she and her family went into hiding from the Nazis.

In 1956, the Flag of the United States Army was officially adopted under an executive order signed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

In 1963, civil rights leader Medgar Evers, 37, was shot and killed outside his home in Jackson, Mississippi. (In 1994, Byron De La Beckwith was convicted of murdering Evers and sentenced to life in prison; he died in 2001.) One of Hollywood’s most notoriously expensive productions, “Cleopatra,” starring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Rex Harrison, opened in New York.

In 1964, South African black nationalist Nelson Mandela was sentenced to life in prison along with seven other people, including Walter Sisulu, for committing sabotage against the apartheid regime (all were eventually released, Mandela in 1990).

In 1967, the Supreme Court, in Loving v. Virginia, struck down state laws prohibiting interracial marriages.

In 1975, an Indian court found Prime Minister Indira Gandhi guilty of electoral corruption and barred her from holding office for six years; Gandhi rejected calls for her to resign.

In 1987, President Ronald Reagan, during a visit to the divided German city of Berlin, publicly challenged Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev to “tear down this wall.”

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Thursday, June 11, the 162nd day of 2015. There are 203 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlights in History:

On June 11, 1919, Sir Barton won the Belmont Stakes, becoming horse racing’s first Triple Crown winner.

On this date:

In 1509, England’s King Henry VIII married his first wife, Catherine of Aragon.

In 1770, Captain James Cook, commander of the British ship Endeavour, discovered the Great Barrier Reef off Australia by running onto it.

In 1938, Johnny Vander Meer pitched the first of two consecutive no-hitters as he led the Cincinnati Reds to a 3-0 victory over the Boston Bees. (Four days later, Vander Meer refused to give up a hit to the Brooklyn Dodgers, who lost, 6-0.)

In 1942, the United States and the Soviet Union signed a lend-lease agreement to aid the Soviet war effort in World War II.

In 1959, the Saunders-Roe Nautical 1, the first operational hovercraft, was publicly demonstrated off the southern coast of England.

In 1962, three prisoners at Alcatraz in San Francisco Bay staged an escape, leaving the island on a makeshift raft; they were never found or heard from again.

In 1963, a Buddhist monk, Thich Quang Duc (tihk kwang duk), set himself afire on a Saigon street to protest the government of South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem (noh deen dyem).

– – –

Thought for Today: “People do not believe lies because they have to, but because they want to.” – Malcolm Muggeridge, British author and commentator (1903-1990).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, June 10, the 161st day of 2015. There are 204 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 10, 1935, Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in Akron, Ohio, by Dr. Robert Holbrook Smith and William Griffith Wilson.

On this date:

In 1692, the first official execution resulting from the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts took place as Bridget Bishop was hanged.

In 1864, the Confederate Congress authorized military service for men between the ages of 17 and 70.

In 1915, author Saul Bellow was born in Lachine, Quebec, Canada.

In 1921, President Warren G. Harding signed into law the Budget and Accounting Act, which created the Bureau of the Budget and the General Accounting Office.

In 1940, Italy declared war on France and Britain; Canada declared war on Italy. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, speaking at the University of Virginia, said the U.S. stance toward the conflict was shifting from one of “neutrality” to “non-belligerency.” Jamaican-born Pan-African nationalist Marcus Garvey died in London at 52.

In 1942, during World War II, German forces massacred 173 male residents of Lidice (LIH’-dyiht-zeh), Czechoslovakia, in retaliation for the killing of Nazi official Reinhard Heydrich.

In 1944, German forces massacred 642 residents of the French village of Oradour-sur-Glane.

In 1967, the Middle East War ended as Israel and Syria agreed to observe a United Nations-mediated cease-fire.

In 1971, President Richard M. Nixon lifted a two-decades-old trade embargo on China.

In 1985, socialite Claus von Bulow was acquitted by a jury in Providence, Rhode Island, at his retrial on charges he’d tried to murder his heiress wife, Martha “Sunny” von Bulow.

In 1991, 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard of South Lake Tahoe, California, was abducted by Phillip and Nancy Garrido; Jaycee was held by the couple for 18 years before she was found by authorities.

In 2004, singer-musician Ray Charles, known for such hits as “What’d I Say,” ”Georgia on My Mind” and “I Can’t Stop Loving You,” died in Beverly Hills, California, at age 73.

– – –

Thought for Today: “When we ask for advice, we are usually looking for an accomplice.” – Saul Bellow (1915-2005).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, June 9, the 160th day of 2015. There are 205 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 9, A.D. 68, Roman Emperor Nero committed suicide, ending a 13-year reign.

On this date:

In 1870, author Charles Dickens died in Gad’s Hill Place, England.

In 1911, Carrie (sometimes spelled “Carry”) A. Nation, the hatchet-wielding temperance crusader, died in Leavenworth, Kansas, at age 64.

In 1915, guitarist, songwriter and inventor Les Paul was born in Waukesha, Wisconsin.

In 1934, the first Walt Disney animated cartoon featuring Donald Duck, “The Wise Little Hen,” was released.

In 1940, during World War II, Norway decided to surrender to the Nazis, effective at midnight.

In 1943, the federal government began withholding income tax from paychecks.

In 1953, 94 people died when a tornado struck Worcester (WU’-stur), Massachusetts.

In 1954, during the Senate-Army Hearings, Army special counsel Joseph N. Welch famously berated Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy, R-Wis., asking McCarthy: “Have you no sense of decency, sir? At long last, have you left no sense of decency?” In 1969, the Senate confirmed Warren Burger to be the new chief justice of the United States, succeeding Earl Warren.

In 1973, Secretariat won the Belmont Stakes, becoming horse racing’s first Triple Crown winner in 25 years.

Thought for Today: “It’s innocence when it charms us, ignorance when it doesn’t.” – Mignon McLaughlin, American journalist

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Monday, June 8, the 159th day of 2015. There are 206 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 8, 1915, U.S. Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned over what he viewed as President Woodrow Wilson’s overly bellicose attitude toward Germany following the sinking of the RMS Lusitania.

On this date:

In A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina.

In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tennessee.

In 1864, Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president during the National Union (Republican) Party’s convention in Baltimore. In 1912, the ballet “Daphnis et Chloe” was premiered by the Ballets Russes in Paris.

In 1948, the “Texaco Star Theater” made its debut on NBC-TV with Milton Berle guest-hosting the first program.

In 1953, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that restaurants in the District of Columbia could not refuse to serve blacks. Eight tornadoes struck Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, killing 126 people.

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Saturday, June 6, the 157th day of 2015. There are 208 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 6, 1944, during World War II, the liberation of German-occupied western Europe began as Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy, France, on “D-Day.”

On this date:

In 1799, American politician and orator Patrick Henry died at Red Hill Plantation in Virginia.

In 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association was founded in London.

In 1925, Walter Percy Chrysler founded the Chrysler Corp.

In 1939, the first Little League game was played as Lundy Lumber defeated Lycoming Dairy 23-8 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

In 1955, the U.S. Post Office introduced regular certified mail service.

In 1965, the Rolling Stones single “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” was released in the United States by London Records, the same day Herman’s Hermits performed their latest hit, “I’m Henry VIII, I Am” on “The Ed Sullivan Show” on CBS-TV.

In 1966, black activist James Meredith was shot and wounded as he walked along a Mississippi highway to encourage black voter registration.

In 1968, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy died at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, a day after he was shot by Sirhan Bishara Sirhan.

In 1978, California voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition 13, a primary ballot initiative calling for major cuts in property taxes.

In 1984, government forces in India stormed the Golden Temple in Amritsar in an effort to crush Sikh extremists; at least 1,000 Sikhs and 200 soldiers were killed.

In 1985, authorities in Brazil exhumed a body later identified as the remains of Dr. Josef Mengele, the notorious “Angel of Death” of the Nazi Holocaust.

In 1994, President Bill Clinton joined leaders from America’s World War II allies to mark the 50th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy. A China Northwest Airlines passenger jet crashed near Xian (SHEE’-ahn), killing all 160 people on board.

Ten years ago: The Supreme Court ruled, 6-3, that people who smoked marijuana because their doctors recommended it to ease pain could be prosecuted for violating federal drug laws. A judge upheld Democratic Gov. Christine Gregoire’s victory – by 129 votes – in Washington state’s 2004 election.

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Friday, June 5, the 156th day of 2015. There are 209 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 5, 1968, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated in Los Angeles’ Ambassador Hotel after claiming victory in California’s Democratic presidential primary. Gunman Sirhan Bishara Sirhan was immediately arrested.

On this date:

In 1794, Congress passed the Neutrality Act, which prohibited Americans from taking part in any military action against a country that was at peace with the United States.

In 1884, Civil War hero Gen. William T. Sherman refused the Republican presidential nomination, saying, “I will not accept if nominated and will not serve if elected.”

In 1933, the United States went off the gold standard.

In 1940, during the World War II Battle of France, Germany attacked French forces along the Somme line.

In 1947, Secretary of State George C. Marshall gave a speech at Harvard University in which he outlined an aid program for Europe that came to be known as The Marshall Plan.

In 1950, the U.S. Supreme Court, in Henderson v. United States, struck down racially segregated railroad dining cars.

In 1963, Britain’s Secretary of State for War, John Profumo, resigned after acknowledging an affair with call girl Christine Keeler, who was also involved with a Soviet spy, and lying to Parliament about it.

In 1967, war erupted in the Mideast as Israel raided military aircraft parked on the ground in Egypt; Syria, Jordan and Iraq entered the conflict.

In 1975, Egypt reopened the Suez Canal to international shipping, eight years after it was closed because of the 1967 war with Israel.

In 1981, the Centers for Disease Control reported that five homosexuals in Los Angeles had come down with a rare kind of pneumonia; they were the first recognized cases of what later became known as AIDS.

In 1999, jazz and pop singer Mel Torme died in Los Angeles at age 73. The Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame, the first devoted to any women’s sport, opened in Knoxville, Tennessee.

In 2004, Ronald Wilson Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, died in Los Angeles at age 93 after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s disease.

Ten years ago: “Monty Python’s Spamalot” won three Tony Awards, including best musical; the musical play “The Light in the Piazza” won six prizes, while “Doubt” was named best drama. Spanish teenager Rafael Nadal beat unseeded Mariano Puerta of Argentina 6-7 (6), 6-3, 6-1, 7-5 to win the French Open men’s singles title.

Five years ago: Israeli forces seized a Gaza-bound aid vessel, the Rachel Corrie, without meeting resistance days after a similar effort turned bloody. Finance ministers and central bankers from the world’s leading economies meeting in Busan,

South Korea, agreed on the need to cooperate in fending off financial market turmoil and keeping the world economic recovery on track. Francesca Schiavone beat Samantha Stosur of Australia, 6-4, 7-6 (2), to win the French Open, giving Italy its first female champion at a Grand Slam tournament. Drosselmeyer pulled off an upset in the Belmont Stakes.

Thought for Today: “Dare to be naive.” – R. Buckminster Fuller, American inventor and philosopher (1895-1983).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Thursday, June 4, the 155th day of 2015. There are 210 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 4, 1940, during World War II, the Allied military evacuation of some 338,000 troops from Dunkirk, France, ended. Addressing the British House of Commons, Prime Minister Winston Churchill declared: “We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender.”

On this date:

In 1783, the Montgolfier brothers first publicly demonstrated their hot-air balloon, which did not carry any passengers, over Annonay, France.

In 1784, opera singer Elisabeth Thible became the first woman to make a non-tethered flight aboard a Montgolfier hot-air balloon, over Lyon, France. In 1892, the Sierra Club was incorporated in San Francisco.

In 1919, Congress approved the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing citizens the right to vote regardless of their gender, and sent it to the states for ratification.

In 1939, the German ocean liner MS St. Louis, carrying more than 900 Jewish refugees from Germany, was turned away from the Florida coast by U.S. officials.

In 1942, the World War II Battle of Midway began, resulting in a decisive American victory against Japan and marking the turning point of the war in the Pacific.

In 1944, U-505, a German submarine, was captured by a U.S. Navy task group in the south Atlantic; it was the first such capture of an enemy vessel at sea by the U.S. Navy since the War of 1812. The U.S. Fifth Army began liberating Rome.

Thought for Today: “When you betray somebody else, you also betray yourself.” – Isaac Bashevis Singer, Nobel Prize-winning author

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, June 3, the 154th day of 2015. There are 211 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 3, 1965, astronaut Edward H. White became the first American to “walk” in space during the flight of Gemini 4.

On this date:

In 1621, the Dutch West India Co. received its charter for a trade monopoly in parts of the Americas and Africa.

In 1808, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was born in Christian County, Kentucky.

In 1888, the poem “Casey at the Bat,” by Ernest Lawrence Thayer, was first published in the San Francisco Daily Examiner.

In 1924, author Franz Kafka, 40, died near Vienna. In 1935, the French liner Normandie set a record on its maiden voyage, arriving in New York after crossing the Atlantic in just four days.

In 1937, Edward, The Duke of Windsor, who had abdicated the British throne, married Wallis Warfield Simpson in a private ceremony in Monts, France.

In 1948, the 200-inch reflecting Hale Telescope at the Palomar Mountain Observatory in California was dedicated.

In 1955, convicted murderer Barbara Graham, 31, was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin State Prison in California, as were two accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins, for the 1953 slaying of Mabel Monahan.

In 1963, Pope John XXIII died at age 81; he was succeeded by Pope Paul VI.

In 1972, Sally J. Priesand was ordained as America’s first female rabbi at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Thought for Today: “It is best to act with confidence, no matter how little right you have to it.” – Lillian Hellman, American playwright

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Tuesday, June 2, the 153rd day of 2015. There are 212 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 2, 1995, a U.S. Air Force F-16C was shot down by a Bosnian Serb surface-to-air missile while on a NATO air patrol in northern Bosnia; the pilot, Capt. Scott F. O’Grady, was rescued by U.S. Marines six days later.

On this date:

In 1863, during the Civil War, Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman wrote a letter to his wife, Ellen, in which he commented, “Vox populi, vox humbug” (The voice of the people is the voice of humbug).

In 1886, President Grover Cleveland, 49, married Frances Folsom, 21, in the Blue Room of the White House. (To date, Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive mansion.)

In 1897, Mark Twain, 61, was quoted by the New York Journal as saying from London that “the report of my death was an exaggeration.”

In 1924, Congress passed a measure that was then signed by President Calvin Coolidge guaranteeing full American citizenship for all Native Americans born within U.S. territorial limits.

In 1941, baseball’s “Iron Horse,” Lou Gehrig, died in New York of a degenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; he was 37.

In 1953, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II took place in London’s Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the death of her father, King George VI.

In 1966, the U.S. space probe Surveyor 1 landed on the moon and began transmitting detailed photographs of the lunar surface.

In 1975, Vice President Nelson Rockefeller said his commission had found no widespread pattern of illegal activities at the Central Intelligence Agency.

In 1983, half of the 46 people aboard an Air Canada DC-9 were killed after fire broke out on board, forcing the jetliner to make an emergency landing at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.

In 1986, for the first time, the public could watch the proceedings of the U.S. Senate on television as a six-week experiment began.

In 1990, actor Sir Rex Harrison died in New York at 82.

In 1997, Timothy McVeigh was convicted of murder and conspiracy in the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. (McVeigh was executed in June 2001.)

Ten years ago: Israel released hundreds of Palestinian prisoners, completing a pledge made under a cease-fire agreement. Closing arguments took place in the Michael Jackson child molestation trial in Santa Maria, California. (Jackson was acquitted.) Georgia’s “runaway bride,” Jennifer Wilbanks, pleaded no contest to faking her own abduction; she was sentenced to probation and community service and fined. Thirteen-year-old Anurag Kashyap (AH’-noo-rahg KAHSH’-yahp) from Poway, California, won the national spelling bee championship in Washington by correctly spelling “appoggiatura,” which means melodic tone.

Five years ago: Amid the Deepwater Horizon oil spill crisis, BP chief executive Tony Hayward apologized for having told reporters, “I’d like my life back,” calling the remark hurtful and thoughtless in a statement posted on Facebook. Taxi driver Derrick Bird went on a murderous rampage across a tranquil part of rural England, leaving 12 dead before committing suicide. Pitcher Armando Galarraga of the Detroit Tigers lost his bid for a perfect game against Cleveland with two outs in the ninth inning.

Thought for Today: “Heroism is not only in the man, but in the occasion.” – Calvin Coolidge, American president (1872-1933).

Almanac

By The Associated Press

Today is Monday, June 1, the 152nd day of 2015. There are 213 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History:

On June 1, 1915, the T.S. Eliot poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” was first published in “Poetry: A Magazine of Verse” in Chicago.

On this date:

In 1533, Anne Boleyn, the second wife of King Henry VIII, was crowned as Queen Consort of England.

In 1792, Kentucky became the 15th state of the union.

In 1796, Tennessee became the 16th state.

In 1813, the mortally wounded commander of the USS Chesapeake, Capt. James Lawrence, gave the order, “Don’t give up the ship” during a losing battle with the British frigate HMS Shannon in the War of 1812.

In 1868, James Buchanan, the 15th president of the United States, died near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, at age 77.

In 1933, in a bizarre scene captured by news photographers, Lya Graf, a female circus dwarf, sat in the lap of financier J.P. Morgan Jr. during a recess of a Senate hearing on the stock market crash of 1929.

In 1943, a civilian flight from Portugal to England was shot down by Germany during World War II, killing all 17 people aboard, including actor Leslie Howard.

In 1955, the romantic comedy “The Seven Year Itch,” starring Marilyn Monroe and Tom Ewell, had its world premiere in New York.

In 1968, author-lecturer Helen Keller, who’d earned a college degree despite being blind and deaf almost all of her life, died in Westport, Connecticut, at age 87.

In 1980, Cable News Network made its debut.

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev signed the foundation of a landmark treaty for the first-ever cuts in strategic nuclear missiles and a pact to slash chemical weapons stockpiles.

In 2009, Air France Flight 447, an Airbus A330 carrying 228 people from Rio de Janeiro to Paris, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean with the loss of everyone on board.

Ten years ago: Paul Wolfowitz began a five-year term as head of the 184-nation World Bank. (Wolfowitz resigned the post in 2007 amid controversy over the generous compensation he’d arranged for his girlfriend, bank employee Shaha Riza.) Dutch voters rejected the European Union constitution. A landslide sent 17 multi-million-dollar houses crashing down a hill in Laguna Beach, California. Peruvian doctors separated the fused legs of Milagros Cerron, a 13-month-old baby girl known as Peru’s “mermaid.” The U.S. version of “Dancing with the Stars” made its debut on ABC-TV (the winners were actress Kelly Monaco and professional partner Alec Mazo).

Five years ago: Attorney General Eric Holder said federal authorities had opened criminal and civil investigations into the BP oil spill. A divided U.S. Supreme Court ruled, 5-4, that criminal suspects had to explicitly invoke their right to remain silent, and that simply remaining silent was not sufficient to stop police questioning. Former Vice President Al Gore and his wife, Tipper, announced their separation after 40 years of marriage.