Concerned about decision

EDITOR:

I am writing to express my alarm at the result of a vote taken this past week in the U.S. Congress House of Representatives concerning a decision on what is basically infanticide, i.e. no prosecution as a result of a decision between a mother and her physician to withhold necessary life-saving care to a live-born infant delivered following a botched abortion attempt in the last stages of pregnancy, e.g. delivery.

I am a retired physician after having been active in the family practice of medicine with limited surgery in the U.P. over 40 years during which time I never performed a single abortion, although I delivered several thousand babies. I took a Hippocratic oath from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1964 to do all I could to help preserve life. My political views reflect that promise.

I strongly believe that our nation was founded by godly men, and that a major reason the American experiment has been so successful is that our nation has continued to honor God for over two centuries now. I fear that if we as a nation turn our backs on our Judeo-Christian heritage, that we may lose the protection of God that America has enjoyed all these generations.

I am the father of an adopted daughter, of whom I am very proud, as she is a full-time hospice registered nurse in lower Michigan. If her birth mother had snuffed out her life when she was pregnant with her while not being married, my daughter’s life would never have happened.

As a result, I am strongly pro-life, and I believe adoption is a far better decision than abortion.

This decision in our Congress will have lasting consequences. It was primarily along party lines, so please consider this in the next election.

P.S. Can anyone explain the line of reasoning that killing a newborn baby with its own unique genetic makeup, who is living and breathing independently outside the mother’s womb constitutes a woman’s health issue? Please let me know if you can explain this at 341-6066

Neil E. Grossnickle, M.D.

Manistique