Health

Pregnancy safe for breast cancer survivors

CHICAGO (AP) — A study gives reassuring news for breast cancer survivors who want to have children. Those who later became pregnant were no more likely to have their cancer come back than those who did not have a baby. It’s a big issue — the average age of moms has been rising in the ...

New frontier in cancer care: Turning blood into living drugs

SEATTLE (AP) — Ken Shefveland’s body was swollen with cancer, treatment after treatment failing until doctors gambled on a radical approach: They removed some of his immune cells, engineered them into cancer assassins and unleashed them into his bloodstream. Immune therapy is the hottest ...

Fancy names may boost healthy dining

CHICAGO (AP) — Researchers tried a big serving of food psychology and a dollop of trickery to get diners to eat their vegetables. And it worked. Veggies given names like “zesty ginger-turmeric sweet potatoes” and “twisted citrus-glazed carrots” were more popular than those prepared ...

Obesity rising in nations rich and poor, especially in kids

NEW YORK (AP) — The global obesity problem now affects 1 in 10 people in the world, it is rising in countries rich and poor, and in many countries it is increasing faster in children than adults, according to a new study. The researchers estimated more than 107 million children and 603 ...

Workouts target body, mind and soul

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be easy to brush off fitness guru Taryn Toomey’s The Class as another hippie trend, but you’d miss the magic. (She sprinkled crushed crystals underneath the studio floors, which she says is designed to draw out energy.) You’d also miss stargazing at celeb ...

Vaccine may cut HPV infections in men

By Marilynn Marchione AP Chief Medical Writer The HPV vaccine that helps prevent cervical cancer in women also might lower the risk in young men of oral infections that can cause mouth and throat cancers, a new study finds. These cancers are rising fast, especially in men, and research ...

Summer offers cool exercise options

ESCANABA — After being cramped inside for months while snow piled up on walks and trails, we all looked forward to the summer months when exercise is free and easy. If you’re a runner, walker or cyclist, you can be out the door in a flash wearing only shorts, T-shirt and a cap to protect ...

Tests for lead poisoning may be faulty, regulators warn

By Linda A. Johnson AP Medical Writer U.S. health agencies on Wednesday warned that certain blood tests for lead poisoning may give results lower than the actual level of lead. As a result, some children under 6, along with pregnant and nursing women, may need retesting, the Food and Drug ...

Few doctors discuss cancer costs with patients, study finds

By Marilynn Marchione AP Chief Medical Writer Most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up, a study that taped hundreds of visits at several large hospitals ...

‘Fat and frail’ seniors benefit from right exercise combo

CHICAGO (AP) — Heavy seniors who want to lose pounds safely shouldn’t skip the weight machines or the treadmill, new research suggests. Experts have worried about recommending weight loss to older, obese people because it speeds up bone and muscle loss, increasing the danger of falls and ...

Aggressive treatment of sepsis can save lives

WASHINGTON (AP) — Minutes matter when it comes to treating sepsis, the killer condition that most Americans probably have never heard of, and new research shows it’s time they learn. Sepsis is the body’s out-of-control reaction to an infection. By the time patients realize they’re in ...

Study: Side effects emerge after approval for many US drugs

CHICAGO (AP) — Almost one-third of new drugs approved by U.S. regulators over a decade ended up years later with warnings about unexpected, sometimes life-threatening side effects or complications, a new analysis found. The results covered all 222 prescription drugs approved by the U.S. ...

Summer offers cool exercise options

After being cramped inside for months while snow piled up on walks and trails, we all looked forward to the summer months when exercise is free and easy. If you’re a runner, walker or cyclist, you can be out the door in a flash wearing only shorts, T-shirt and a cap to protect your head ...

First-in-nation law targets doctor shortage

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Numerous additional doctors from around the U.S. could become eligible to treat patients in Missouri’s underserved areas as a result of a planned expansion of a first-in-the-nation law aimed at addressing a pervasive doctor shortage. The newly passed Missouri ...

Tailpipe tests vastly underestimate diesel pollution

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pollution from diesel trucks, buses and cars globally is more than 50 percent higher than levels shown in government lab tests, a new study says. That extra pollution translated to another 38,000 deaths from soot and smog in 2015, the researchers estimated. The work ...

Dogs help kids with autism on their dentist visits

SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Diego Rosales was so terrified during his dental appointments when he was 4 that he kept biting his dentist. Today, the 9-year-old is far calmer, soothed by the presence of “Zucca,” a black Labrador that helps children like him with autism face one of their worst ...

Service dog helps woman cope with seizures

SOUTHFIELD, Mich. (AP) — When you enter Kiara Williamson’s Southfield home the first thing she asks you to do is pray for her. The 23-year-old has cerebral palsy and cri du chat, a chromosomal disorder, and a seizure disorder. She often experiences two to 45 seizures per day and needs ...

Protect against carbon monoxide

WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are on the trail of a potential antidote for carbon monoxide poisoning, an injected “scavenger” that promises to trap and remove the gas from blood within minutes. It’s very early-stage research — but a reminder that, however it turns out, there are steps ...

Overcoming Opioids: When pills are a hospital’s last resort

BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders’ thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he’d been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. “I can’t ...

Tips for finding opioid alternatives for surgical pain

By The Associated Press Headed for surgery? Specialists say talking to your doctors ahead of time may turn up ways to control post-operative pain while minimizing use of those problematic painkillers called opioids. Among the advice: - Ask what to expect. Patients who are overly anxious ...