Students tour the DSISD

Courtesy photo
Health Occupations instructor, Gisele Bingham, instructs student on life-saving technique.

Courtesy photo Health Occupations instructor, Gisele Bingham, instructs student on life-saving technique.

ESCANABA–Local eighth grade students had the chance to tour the Delta-Schoolcraft Intermediate School District (DSISD) last week as part of Eighth Grade Friday, hosted by the Delta County College Access Network (DCCAN) and Bay College in Escanaba.

The event was held to show local students all the ISD has to offer including automotive technology, welding, machining, health occupations, careers in education, computer technician, construction, and pre-engineering. Students who attend the school, get their training at the ISD and at business and industry work sites in the community. For example, 35 ISD students apply the skills they learned in their health occupations program at the Christian Park Village work site two days each week.

Students gain practical technical skills that they can use for the rest of their lives, and training that can launch them into high demand, high paying careers. In addition, students are able to take ISD classes any of their high school years, but most students are sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Students who attend the ISD can earn between 5-15 college credits, and extra high school graduation credits, in each technical education program. For example, taking a welding class at the ISD will fulfill a students graduation requirement for their 4th year of math and second year of a foreign language.

Through events that include the ISD and post secondary education places like Bay College, students discover technical education pathways that lead to high paying, high demand careers.

Other events that raise awareness include eighth grade career fairs coordinated with the Delta County College Access Network and Bay College. Over 500 young students visit technical education programs and experience a bit of technical training. Some of the experiences include taking blood pressure, testing a car battery, and using construction tools. By exposing younger students to technical education programs, students gain an awareness of training opportunities that are available to them, and they learn a little bit about what workers do in careers like machining and engineering.

Instructors at the ISD work closely with business and industry partners and Michigan Works to offer

students talent tours to businesses like Boss Snowplow in Iron Mountain and Tyco Industries in Marinette. By visiting worksites I.S.D. students see how their technical skills are applied in the world of work, and they hear from work site managers what skills they look for in employees.

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